Water quality and pesticide performance

This is a useful reference from Purdue Extension on water that goes into the spray tank. From the guide: "Water often comprises ninety-five percent (or more) of the spray solution. What affect might it have on product performance? Research clearly shows that the quality of water used for spraying can affect how pesticides perform. Its… Continue reading Water quality and pesticide performance

Understanding how turfgrass herbicides work

This is a fine guide from Breeden, Brosnan, and Vargas at the University of Tennessee: Understanding how turfgrass herbicides work. It's about herbicide active ingredients and the associated mechanism of action class for those herbicides. It's important to know this so herbicide mechanism of action can be rotated. This is something you want to do… Continue reading Understanding how turfgrass herbicides work

Energy for growth, and weeds

Two things today are kind of related to this topic. One is this — Jim Brosnan mentioned, and showed photographic evidence, that “weed pressure on Oahu never ceases to amaze.” A sea of sedge. Weed pressure on Oahu never ceases to amaze. #weeds #turf pic.twitter.com/QOaNuo3eAG — Jim Brosnan, Ph.D. (@UTTurfWeeds) September 28, 2015 And I… Continue reading Energy for growth, and weeds

One to add to the reading list

Jim Brosnan's article from last week's Green Section Record is one you will want to add to the reading list, and after reading it, to your reference file. Entitled Golf's Most Common Weed-Control Challenges, Brosnan gives an overview of the particularly problematic weeds and the most current information about their control — especially for warm-season… Continue reading One to add to the reading list

Turfgrass ecology, part 1: abandoned turf in Japan

These photos from an abandoned golf course in the southern part of the Tohoku region of Japan are fascinating. They show clearly how three different species perform when they are not maintained for 18 months in that climate. From a consideration of the grass performance when abandoned, one can get a good idea of the… Continue reading Turfgrass ecology, part 1: abandoned turf in Japan

Park Grass experiment video

Last week I was browsing the Sir John Bennet Lawes timeline and discovered this excellent video with plant ecologist Jonathan Storkey introducing the Park Grass Experiment. The Park Grass experiment at Rothamsted was started in 1856 and has been continuously monitored ever since. That makes it the oldest experiment on permanent grassland in the world.  The… Continue reading Park Grass experiment video

The greens here have never been better: on EIQ and pest management programs

This is one of those "if I were a greenkeeper today, this is how I would do it" type of stories. At the Bethpage maintenance facility; research here demonstrates that use of EIQ can reduce environmental impact from 33 to 85% while producing the same quality turfgrass I was pleased to read the update from… Continue reading The greens here have never been better: on EIQ and pest management programs

Counting Down, Top 5 Posts of 2011

Various interesting posts hide in the back pages of blogs, and I’ve enjoyed seeing which of the posts from the early years of this blog were most popular, as measured by the number of pageviews. Continuing with the lists of top posts by year since the inception of this blog in 2009, here are the… Continue reading Counting Down, Top 5 Posts of 2011

An Observation About Deep Rough on Tropical Golf Courses

Grazed native grass near Mysore, India I'm sometimes asked what grass species should be used for a deep rough on a tropical golf course. Golf course architects or golf course developers sometimes want something that can provide a contrast to the highly-maintained fairways, yet still remain playable. "Something that looks and plays like fine fescue,"… Continue reading An Observation About Deep Rough on Tropical Golf Courses